• Pleasure

    Pleasure, is an erotic story about love, jealousy, and obsession from a female point of view...

  • Sleeping With Strangers

    Steamy, sensual and poetically hypnotic, Missionary No More: Purple Panties 2 is the follow-up to the bestseller Purple Panties...

  • Get these titles for only $2

    Get 4 erotic titles for only $2, plus receive a free gift. Click here...

  • Resurrecting Midnight

    Gideon, a hired gun, trusts no one. But when his former lover resurfaces in need of his skills, Gideon accepts...

  • Dying for Revenge

    For successful African-American businesswoman Zoe Reynard, finding the pleasure she wants, the way she wants it...

  • Waking with Enemies

    A heated encounter inside a London hotel room (where he was pursued by three very different women) leaves Gideon waking up to a world where there’s no one to trust...

  • Get these titles for only $2

    Get 4 erotic titles for only $2, plus receive a free gift. Click here...

  • Tempted by Trouble

    We can plan all we want, but sometimes fate has a different agenda...

Who is Eric Jerome Dickey?

Eric Jerome Dickey (born July 7, 1961) is a New York Times best-selling American author best known for his novels about contemporary African-American life. He is also known for writing several crime novels involving drifters, ex cons, and assassins, the latter novels having more diverse settings, moving from Los Angeles to the UK to the West Indies, each having an international cast of characters.

Eric Jerome Dickey was born in Memphis, Tennessee on July 7, 1961. He grew up on the south side of Memphis, living on Kansas Street. He went to Riverview Elemetary, Riverview Junior High, and Carver High. After graduating high school, he went to college at Memphis State University, where he earned a degree in Computer System Technology. In 1983, he moved to Los Angeles to pursue a career in engineering.

Dickey was employed in the aerospace industry working at Rockwell International, ASSD division, as a software developer, before deciding that he wanted to pursue acting and stand-up comedy, and began the local and national comedy circuit.

Dickey wrote several comedy scripts for his personal comedy act, and later began writing short stories. In 1994, his first published short story "Thirteen" appeared in the IBWA's River Crossing, Voices of the Diaspora--an Anthology of the International Black Experience. A second short story "Days Gone By" was published in the magazine A Place to Enter.

Eric Jerome Dickey then developed a screenplay called "Cappuccino." "Cappuccino" was directed and produced by Craig Ross Jr. and appeared in coffeehouses around the Los Angeles area. In February 1998, "Cappuccino" made its local debut during the Pan African Film Festival at the Magic Johnson Theater in Los Angeles.

Eric Jerome Dickey has authored fifteen novels and has been featured in a variety publications, including Essence magazine, USA Today and The Los Angeles Times, and his novels have appeared on the bestseller lists of the "Blackboard," The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. Dickey has appeared as a guest on many shows, including BET's Our Voices and CNN's Sunday Morning Live.

His latest books, "Sleeping with Strangers" and "Waking with Enemies" were released on April 10, 2007 and August 7, 2007, respectively. His 14th novel, "Pleasure", was released in April, 2008.

Eric is the author of the graphic novel called 'Storm', detailing the first meeting between the popular X-Men character Ororo Munroe and the king of the fictional land of Wakanda, the Black Panther.

Eric Jerome Dickey is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

On November 1, 2008 Eric will release his 15th solo work entitled Dying for Revenge.

The Other Woman

The Other Woman
by Eric Jerome Dickey

Paperback: 336 pages
Publisher: NAL Trade (July 6, 2004)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0451211936
ISBN-13: 978-0451211934

Purchase at Amazon



Plans for revenge spin out of control in this sharp-edged, sizzling novel by bestselling Dickey (Liar's Game; Between Lovers). The unnamed narrator has it all-a loving husband, a beautiful home and a lucrative career as a television producer in Los Angeles. Although she works long hours, she knows that she and her husband, Charles, a middle-school teacher, depend on her earnings to live the good life. Upon receiving strange messages at work from a mysterious man named David Lawrence, she assumes that he is a media-hungry stalker. But when David finally reaches her, he tells her that her husband has been having an affair with his wife, Jessica. The reporter in her takes over, and she immediately confronts Charles, who admits that he had an affair with Jessica, but says it is over. Confused, angry and in complete shock, she demands that Charles give her the intimate details of the affair; he refuses. "And I'm supposed to accept that?... My marriage is supposed to be my place of solace, not a place of fucking grief, and my husband is supposed to my friend, not my fucking enemy. Choose which one you wanna be." Unwilling to go on without answers to her many questions, she soon finds herself commiserating with David Lawrence. As the pieces of the puzzle come together, her world falls apart and she finds herself desperate for revenge. But will revenge heal her tattered soul or destroy her completely? Dickey offers plenty of straight-on sex and violence, but also probes questions of contemporary morals and the psychology of betrayal, writing compellingly and believably from his heroine's point of view. This will be another crowd pleaser.

From bookreporter.com source

Eric Jerome Dickey is finally starting to get his due. He has weathered the unfortunate label of "black author" and has simply become known as an author, and a very good one. His characters are mostly black, true, and there are even some real "African-Americans" in THE OTHER WOMAN (there's an Ethiopian immigrant, for one) but the concerns he writes about in THE OTHER WOMAN can affect anyone, of any race. Still, I don't think that anyone can write about them quite the way Dickey can.

THE OTHER WOMAN is told from the point of view of Freckles, a television newswriter who is married to Charles, a middle school teacher. Their situation is, I think, fairly common: they both work, they're on somewhat different schedules, and they are all too often like ships passing (and occasionally and hurriedly bumping) in the night. Things aren't bad between them, not by any means, but they're maybe a little too ... complacent. They're in a content and comfortable, if not exciting, groove.

That at least is what Freckles believes until she begins receiving frantic calls from David Lawrence. Lawrence has a tale to tell: his wife, Jessica, is having a torrid affair with Charles. Freckles confronts Charles, who admits the affair but downplays his emotional involvement, even as he is confronted with the truth that the affair has been carried out over the course of eight months. Lawrence has proof in the form of instant messages between the two lovers that are explosive in their content. Lawrence, perhaps the most complex character in THE OTHER WOMAN, has an agenda of his own. Hurting and humiliated, he uses Freckles as an instrument of revenge against both his wife and her paramour. The conclusion is explosive but no less shocking in its inevitability.

Dickey does an incredible job here. I don't think I've ever read a novel by a male writer who has done such an excellent job of getting into a woman's psyche. I'm not sure if I can describe this correctly, but here it goes. There are those areas of a woman's emotions that a man has some difficulty understanding. Dickey gets the description of those emotions just right. But where a man would ordinarily try to explain those and break them down to be understood, Dickey does not. Dickey, in the literary sense, understands what Wynton Marsalis has stated in the musical sense: that what is not played is often as important as what is played. This doesn't mean Dickey neglects the guys, however. The guys react as males will do. Do they ever.

One other thing. Dickey does not exactly shirk away from graphic sexual descriptions. While he is not subtle in his descriptions, however, he is never gratuitous. THE OTHER WOMAN reads as if Dickey spent some quality time talking with women about what they want and want they need. Oh, one other thing. If there is a sudden run on the Altoids 12-packs at the local Sam's Club, it's because of THE OTHER WOMAN. And gentlemen, an extensive field study I conducted recently indicates that it works both ways, if you're interested in giving as good as you get.

THE OTHER WOMAN is a book about women and men --- and is for both. Dickey just gets better and better at what he does and is finally getting the widespread recognition he deserves. This is one book that everyone needs to check out, for many reasons.

Thieves' Paradise

Thieves' Paradise
by Eric Jerome Dickey

Paperback: 416 pages
Publisher: Signet (May 6, 2003)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0451208498
ISBN-13: 978-0451208491

In Thieves' Paradise, bestselling author Eric Jerome Dickey weaves an engaging tale of betrayal, desperation, love, and loss seen through the eyes of Dante Black. Unemployed and down on his luck, Dante spends most of his time frequenting an L.A. diner where he hopes to win over Pam, an attractive waitress and actress wannabe. The rest of his time is spent reluctantly working for Scamz, a colorful character from Dante's past with a taste for illegal operations, beautiful women, and flashy cars. Rounding out this cast of clich├ęd yet well-developed characters is Dante's best friend, Jackson, who's deep in debt and eager for a quick solution. Throughout the novel, Dante drifts through seedy pool halls and lavish mansions as his friends quickly become enemies, lovers, and unbearable burdens.

My life had been mean and violent, so all of that colored my perception... Hard to find peace in a storm. I'd been waiting for the storm to leave me. Sometimes you had to leave the storm.
Always fresh, often perceptive, occasionally funny, and undeniably sincere, Thieves' Paradise proves yet again why Dickey continues to top the charts with each artful novel he crafts. --Gisele Toueg --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From bookreporter.com source

Eric Jerome Dickey has had a great deal of success, especially as of late. His newest offering, THIEVES' PARADISE, despite an occasional flaw or two, should follow in the successful footsteps of its predecessors --- Dickey's two New York Times bestsellers, LIAR'S GAME and BETWEEN LOVERS.

It should be noted at the outset that THIEVES' PARADISE is not an easy book to stay with. It sometimes has trouble deciding whether it wants to be straight fiction, mystery, or romance. It is all and none of these, being, ultimately...a story. Nothing wrong with that. The violence is graphic, sudden and to the point. If it seems gratuitous to the unschooled, be advised that this is how it goes down in large cities, more often than not. Although THIEVES' PARADISE is set in Los Angeles, it could happen anywhere. In New Orleans, for example, crime statistics released by the city indicate that in the year 2001, 99 per cent of all of the homicides there involved 1) drugs; 2) family disputes; and 3) arguments. It is no different in the Los Angeles of THIEVES' PARADISE. There is also some graphic sexual content, maybe a bit more than you might be used to, though the individuals involved aren't doing anything you haven't heard of.

With those caveats out of the way, onward and upward to the story. THIEVES' PARADISE is primarily the story of Dante, a walking mass of contradictions and complications. Dante is a graduate of the Los Angeles juvenile penal system, and he has no intention of returning to either his alma mater or to its graduate school. Having acquired a computer job that allows him to support himself, Dante has no reason to ever engage in criminal activity again.

Two events, however, conspire to derail his life. When Dante is laid off from his job, his financial obligations make it difficult for him to resist when Scamz, a criminal operator from his past, comes calling with a proposition. Scamz is living large, and while Dante does not necessarily aspire to his lifestyle, the offer that Scamz makes to Dante will not only resolve Dante's financial problems but also those of his friend, Jackson, and Dante's new love Pam, who dreams of a future in Hollywood while she deals with the nightmare of her past.

What is supposed to be salvation for Dante and his friends, however, soon results in disaster, and Scamz's solutions get everyone deeper into trouble instead of extricating them from it. Before the caper is over Dante is left with some hard decisions made harder by his inability to determine who is his enemy and who is his true friend.

Dickey's unblinking view of the street and the people who populate it is fully realized in THIEVES' PARADISE. While not a novel for everyone, it will win fans among those who like their shot of the street served straight up and uncut.

Sister, Sister

It takes guts for a male writer to tackle the trials and tribulations of upwardly mobile African American women. But that's what Dickey does, with mixed results, in his first novel, a high-spirited celebration of black sisterhood. Southern California sisters Valerie and Inda are close. Fair-skinned Valerie is the younger of the two and takes after their white mother in appearance. After six years of lousy marriage to Walter, she knows she's miserable but doesn't know any role other than that of satellite eternally in orbit around a husband. Inda, who inherited their father's dark skin and features, has a stable career, but a divorce from her white husband has made her pessimistic about men of any color, a situation exacerbated by flagrant evidence of her current lover's infidelities. Inda meets Chiquita, a young flight attendant, whom she instinctively likes, and their friendship is cast when they discover they both have been simultaneously deceived by Raymond, who is engaged to a third woman. Chiquita is drawn into the girls' tight-knit family as she falls for their brother, Brown, and learns something from them about courage and love. In recovering from their individual disappointments, Valerie, Inda and Chiquita risk new relationships, strengthened by one another's humor, candor and understanding. The book suffers somewhat from multiple points of view and an unevenness of characterization. Inda and Chiquita, who are given first-person voices, are bold and sassy. Valerie, whose sections are all third-person narrative, is sketchy by comparison. Though flawed, Dickey's novel brims with humor, outrageousness and an understanding of the generosity of affection.

Liar's Game

The women Vince Browne meets in Los Angeles all seem to want rich men, gorgeous brothers, men without pasts. After watching yet another romantic prospect walk away, he decides to be less than honest with the next beautiful woman he meets: "I played the role and hid from my memories, told Dana I was a black man working hard every day, as single as a dollar bill, no kids, no ex-wives, no problems. With every word I dug my hole deeper." Of course, Dana has a few secrets of her own, but her chemistry with Vince convinces her she that can just start over without sharing such details. When this new couple's self-protective lies begin to unravel, they have to decide whether they even like each other--let alone how to overcome their hurt. One night in Vince's apartment, after learning about his divorce, Dana jumps up to dial *69 after someone calls and hangs up.
That was the first time she'd done that to me. There was a difference in her. In us. A hardness that comes when trust has thinned. Both of us had flipped, become the other side of a dented coin. Some sort of smile was on her face, but traces of her history were in her eyes.
Eric Jerome Dickey's devoted readers won't be disappointed with Liar's Game. As in Cheaters and Milk in My Coffee, his easy, conversational style, his humor, his well-rounded characters, and his sexy plot twists will keep the pages turning. He is one of very few writers presenting diverse, realistic images of middle-class African Americans with everyday concerns about jobs and education, finding and keeping love, raising responsible children, and staying alive in the city.

Milk in My Coffee

When a black man meets a white woman and they fall in love, sometimes there are more pressing matters that concern them than the predictable fuss over an interracial relationship. The latest novel from the popular Dickey (Friends and Lovers) is as much about relationships as it is about race. Both Jordan Greene, a 30ish engineer, and Kimberly Chavers, a 28-year-old artist, have thorny connections with friends, former lovers and relatives that they must unravel before they can even begin to think about a life together. For Jordan, there is his on-again, off-again relationship with fiery J'nette, who says she is carrying his baby. There is his friendship with his confidant Solomon, who is engaged to J'nette's best friend but may be less trustworthy than he seems. Then there is Jordan's family. When he flies from New York to his native small town of Brownsville, Tenn., to attend the funeral of his ex-stepfather, Jordan is caught in the thick of family woes. His half-brother, Reggie, has finally checked into a drug rehabilitation program but only after casting their older brother, Darrell, into bankruptcy. In the rural South, where racial tensions are more frightening and immediate than Jordan remembers, he must not only suffer his older brother's harangues against dating white women but also do so while loaning him money. Kimberly, meanwhile, is trying to rid herself of an obnoxious, white ex-boyfriend and come to grips with a secret past that she fears will make Jordan doubt her love for him. By the time she shows Jordan her skeletons, makes up with a troubled family of her own and faces down violence on the streets of New York, Dickey has demonstrated once again his easy mastery of dialogue and voice (both romantic leads share narrator's honors with an omniscient third-person) and his cheerful, wittily acerbic eye for the troubles that plague lovers in the 1990s.

Chasing Destiny

Dickey's (Genevieve) latest melodrama rides with Los Angeles's rough-and-tumble motorcycle crowd and has his signature sultry prose and African-American cast, but presents a surprisingly harsh attitude toward female characters. Billie (aka Ducati), a beautiful and self-assured biker, finds herself between the rubber and the road when her unemployed lover, Keith, confesses he's returning to his wife, Carmen, for the sake of their daughter-right after Billie informs him she's pregnant with his child. Carmen, a shady lawyer, will stop at nothing to reconcile her marriage, offering Billie money to vamoose and even threatening her own daughter, 15-year-old Destiny. Destiny, however, has her own problems: angry at her parents for separating, she rebels by sneaking out with the wrong crowd. When she's drugged, robbed and raped, a humiliated Destiny decides to run away rather than face her parents. By midnovel, Carmen, Billie and Keith are, yes, chasing Destiny and deploying dirty tricks to get what they want. With an emphasis on vulgarity and violence, the book is lively, but disappointing: rather than showcase what brings women together, Dickey hyperbolizes what tears them apart, advancing a caricature of women as troubled souls who, when hurt, hurt others.

Drive Me Crazy

An ex-con tries to make good while an old flame tries to make trouble in this smart, gritty and gripping 10th novel by bestseller Dickey (Naughty or Nice, etc.). "[S]ix-two and dark as an open road," Driver spent two years in lockdown to spare his gay albino brother, Rufus; these days he's a chauffeur. Driver likes to hang with his boss, Wolf; they drink beer, have a laugh, do the crossword, shoot pool. It's all cool—as long as Wolf doesn't find out about Driver's affair with Lisa, Wolf's wife. Even worse, Lisa gave Driver 15 large to kill her husband. Driver couldn't do it, but he spent the money on his mother's funeral; Lisa will forgive the debt if Driver keeps "dicking her down." When he won't, she tries to run him down with her Hummer. Next trick? An ugly pair of thugs who stalk and threaten him. Meanwhile, Driver must drive a visiting celebrity author—notorious for inflammatory race-related statements and for wearing the silver briefcase containing his next million-dollar book handcuffed to his wrist—all over L.A. Steamy sex scenes alternate with mayhem and vandalism; the lively, truncated dialogue is filled with literary references, product placements and newsworthy names. Urban melodrama, gorgeous grifters, a tough but likable hero and sharp takes on racial politics add up to another winner.

Dying for Revenge

After a bestselling doubleheader in 2007 with Sleeping with Strangers and Waking with Enemies (both reaching #9 on the New York Times bestseller list), Eric Jerome Dickey is back with the final installment in his thrilling trilogy—Dying for Revenge.

This fast-paced story about a steamy, seamy underworld of crime that spans the globe features the hit man Gideon, a character who captivated fans in the first two books, squaring off against his most intriguing adversary yet.

Waking with Enemies

Ten-time New York Times bestselling author Eric Jerome Dickey sizzles in this rapid-fire sequel to Sleeping with Strangers, which finds international hit man Gideon waking up with his past haunting him and danger knocking at his door.

A heated encounter inside a London hotel room (where he was pursued by three very different women) leaves Gideon waking up to a world where there’s no one to trust. Someone has taken out a hit on the hit man—but who? The clock is ticking as Gideon tries to pin down the man who was sent to kill him – a mysterious man with a broken nose who shadows his every move – while also finding out who from his past might have ordered the hit. Could it be the man he left alive in Tampa, the woman who taught him to kill, the scorned woman he still desires, or some other unseen enemy? As the hunter becomes the hunted, Gideon will need to find his friends—and his enemies—to get out of the game alive.

From the back streets of London to Amsterdam’s red light district, Waking with Enemies is an international game of cat and mouse, in which Gideon must protect those he loves and face the possibility of his own death.

Another “page turner” from Eric Jerome Dickey

Eric Jerome Dickey, the prolific potboiler novelist, has written a new novel called Sleeping With Strangers, about a contract killer who is hired to kill a preacher.

The novel is said to have numerous “twists and turns” that will keep the reader guessing, all the while pulling the reader into the life of the killer. From London hangouts, to the killer’s troubled past, to a myriad of horror and violence that fans
say, keeps them “glued to the pages”.

Dickey has written a dozen novels, and plans to have another released in August, called Walking With Enemies.

Sleeping With Strangers is what fans say has just enough action and the right “James Bond touches.” Dutton is the publisher and it runs at 336 pages for $24.95.

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Eric Jerome Dickey and the Cheaters!

Some describe him as the "male Terry McMillan". If that is a compliment one thing is true, Eric Jerome Dickey has made a name for himself, in his own right.

Dickey's newest release, Cheaters, well exemplifies his talent, as well as showcasing his style.

Cheaters is somewhat like a soap-opera, except it's characters are 3-Dimensional and the plot is much better. Stephan Mitchell, the ladies man has been told over and again to move out of the fast lane and to pull over. It isn't until the 'playa gets played' and Chante Ellis moves into his life does he stop to reassess his morals and life. Chante Ellis is quick on the draw with retorts and even more in a hurry to label a first date as love and to go to bed with the current male. On the verge of swearing off men she meets and likes Stephan but when the slightest stench of "player" hits her nostrils Chante bids Stephan goodbye.

One of Stephan's best friends is Darnell, a good guy. Married, fully employeed and a lawyer and faithful- kind of. When introduced to Tammy, a friend of Chante's, Darnell notices that there is someone out there who understands him better than his own wife.

Cheaters , with it's many overlapping storylines and laugh out loud humor, should no doubt become a Hollywood movie. Human and imperfect, these adults of the 90's are trying to find real love. The fans of Eric Jerome Dickey will remeber a couple of the secondary characters from his previous novels.

Forget checking Cheaters out of the library. This is a definite "must purchase". You can trade your local bookstore $24.95 for a copy from Dutton Press.

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5 questions for Eric Jerome Dickey

Best-selling writer Eric Jerome Dickey specializes in action. Action in the bedroom. Action with a gun. USA TODAY spoke with Dickey, 46, about his new novel, Waking With Enemies (Dutton, $24.95), a sequel that stars a hit man named Gideon. He's on the run in Europe — with plenty of sexy women after him.

1: You've written 14 hit novels. What's your secret? Conflict. If you don't have conflict, you don't turn the pages. … My characters are troubled souls with a lot of inner struggle and outer struggle.

2: Your earlier books Sister, Sister and Milk in My Coffee were more relationship-oriented. Are you getting more gritty? I don't read just one genre, and I don't want to have to write just one genre. … I used to write gritty short stories before I was first published.

3: What writers do you like?I just bought these books: The Stolen Heart by Joyce Carol Oates (writing as Lauren Kelly); Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer and Quiet Days in Clichy; William Henry Lewis' I Got Somebody in Staunton; Sarahbeth Purcell's Love Is the Drug; and Kathryn Harrison's Envy.

4: Do friends or family ever say your books shock them? They might have thought that, but no one has said it to me. It's like picking up Playboy and complaining about the centerfold.

5: Would your readers be disappointed if you didn't have the incredible love life of your characters?How would they know? I keep my personal life personal.


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Eric Jerome Dickey Finds New 'Pleasure'

Pleasure
by Eric Jerome Dickey

Hardcover: 449 pages
Publisher: Dutton Adult (April 1, 2008)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0525950451
ISBN-13: 978-0525950455

Purchase at Amazon



Writer Eric Jerome Dickey has written a string of best-selling novels about contemporary African-American life.

He's now trying a new genre: erotica.

His latest work, Pleasure, is an erotic story about love, jealousy, and obsession from a female point of view.

Below is an excerpt:

Thunder boomed as I ran through the downpour and raced to my car.

As soon as I closed the door, I picked up my cellular and called Logan. Chalk that up to irresistible impulse driven by a mixture of angst and rage.

Logan answered on the first ring. "Is this my Trini girl finally calling me back?"

I swallowed. He knew I had been born at Port of Spain. He knew my father had been killed before I was born, knew that a year later my mother had ended up meeting a hard-working and financially prudent man from Los Angeles, then my Trini days were over and my West Coast life began. Not many people knew that. Not many people knew much about me. I liked it that way.

I said, "Logan."

"I miss you."

His desperate and sincere tone halted me, made me, in that moment, feel massive guilt.

"Was worried about you, Nia. Been sick worrying about you."

"Just got your . . . your . . . the . . . that . . . the letter you sent, I just got it."

"What do you think?"

I wanted to tell that college graduate and successful businessman to learn the difference between their and there, that there was no letter D in congratulate, wanted to tell him to relearn the I before E rule, really wanted to point out irregardless wasn't a word, wanted to drive home, take a red pen and mark corrections all over his bloated six-page manifesto and mail it back to him, FedEx, overnight.

I took a breath. "I'm . . . we . . . look . . . we really should talk, to clear the air between us."

"Good. I'm in Atlanta."

I paused. "What?"

"I'm in the ATL."

"What are you doing in Atlanta?"

"Drove down in the rain."

"You drove four hundred miles in the rain? Why would you do that?"

"I need to see you. This has to be handled face-to-face."

I closed my eyes, rubbed my neck. "Are you really in Atlanta?"

"It's raining hard. Skies are black. Lots of thunder and lightning."

"When did you get here?"

"Not too long ago."

"What are you doing here?"

"Was waiting to hear from you, left you a few messages, said I was coming down."

"Well, we hadn't agreed … even if you left a message … we hadn't talked about you coming down here. There is more to an agreement than you leaving a message, then doing what you want to do."

"Why haven't you answered my calls?"

Pressure mounted and I rubbed my temples, the answer to that question seemingly obvious.

What I felt was the opposite of pleasure. I had left him. I had sensed there was going to be an emotional earthquake, knew in advance, and had left without warning. Now that earthquake was here.

He asked, "Can I come over?"

"No."

"I've been driving close to seven hours on bad roads. Will you at least meet me?"

"Where are you?"

"Midtown."

I said, "You're in Midtown? Where in Midtown?"

"Atlantic Station."

I paused, thought about it. "You know where Wal-Mart is?"

"I can find Howell Mill Road with my GPS. Where is Wal-Mart?"

"When you get off, go left. You'll see a brand-new plaza on the left. A Verizon and a Starbucks and a Ross are up top. Wal-Mart is down on the lower level, underground. Meet me down there."

I hung up.

My heart beat like I had just finished a grueling run.

I was afraid.

I had left his number programmed in my cellular so whenever he called, DNA LOGAN popped up on my screen. Do Not Answer, Logan. I hadn't responded to Logan's calls, text messages, faxes, hadn't responded to any form of communication for almost a season. When I was done, I was done. Cold turkey if I had to. Up until the text message he had sent this morning, he'd stopped reaching out at least a month ago. Never expected to hear from him again. At least not this soon. Not like this. In my mind he had finally cut bait and moved on. Maybe because I had moved on a long time ago. I cursed.

Here I go with this madness. I didn't want to deal with this insanity. I thought this part of my life was over. I thought I was free. But I was wrong. I had to go get my freedom. I had to fight for what I already owned.

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Eric Jerome Dickey's Rise to Fame

Eric Jerome Dickey has made a name for himself as "one of the few kings of popular African-American fiction for women," according to the New York Times. By 2006 Dickey had topped the New York Times bestseller list six times. Selling more than 500,000 books each year since 1999, Dickey has found a large reading audience with his novels that shatter stereotypes about blacks as they explore complex relationships between the sexes. The depth and realism with which Dickey infuses his characters have prompted comparisons to the popular author Terry McMillan. While Dickey's novels have focused on the ups and downs of love in all its forms, they also expose the humor in the foibles and follies of romance. They also celebrate the incredible power of friendship to heal emotional wounds and pave the road to true and lasting relationships. This "Dickey-esque" approach has made him immensely popular with readers, who eagerly buy up his latest works and appear in droves at his book signings.

Followed an Unlikely Road to Fame

As a child growing up in Memphis, Tennessee, Dickey demonstrated no special talent or avid interest in writing. Upon graduating from Carver High School, he set his sights on a career in engineering rather than the arts and earned a degree in computer system technology at Memphis State University (later known as the University of Memphis). After college Dickey moved to Los Angeles to take a job as a software developer for Rockwell, an aerospace company that later became part of Boeing. While spending the next nine years doing technical writing, Dickey found his artistic side kept rising to the surface. He satisfied this urge by pursuing various acting roles and also appearing as a stand-up comedian. Eventually his comedy stints put him in front of a microphone at clubs across the west, from Seattle, Washington, to San Antonio, Texas.

Dickey's "extracurricular" activities assumed a more prominent role in his life when a recession hit the aerospace industry in the early 1990s and put him out of work as a result of company "downsizing." At this time Dickey began devoting more time to writing, especially poetry and short stories. "I'd written a few shorts in high school, nothing great, but during the time I was about to get laid off, I sat back and recaptured that," he told chance22 publishing on the Web. Dickey added that he "remembered how much fun it was to make something out of nothing, and get ALL of the credit for it."

To help accelerate the evolution of his writing talent, Dickey decided to join the International Black Writers and Artists (IBWA) association and enroll in some of their workshops. He then earned an IBWA SEED scholarship for taking creative writing classes at the University of California at Los Angeles. Before long Dickey had published his first short story, a piece entitled "Thirteen" that appeared in an IBWA publication called River Crossing, Voices of the Diaspora: An Anthology of the International Black Experience. He followed this up with another short story, "Days Gone By," that was published in the magazine A Place to Enter. These successes led Dickey to reexamine some pieces he had written earlier, out of which evolved a screenplay called Cappuccino that was later filmed and aired in coffeehouses around the Los Angeles area.

First Novel Rose to Bestseller Status

Major recognition came Dickey's way with the publication of his first novel, Sister, Sister, by Dutton of the Penguin Putnam Inc. publishing group in 1996. The book made it to number one on the "Blackboard Bestsellers List" featured in Essence magazine and earned the author legions of fans coast to coast. Hailed for its wit and vibrant characters, Sister, Sister tells the story of three young black women in Los Angeles whose relationships with men and each other intersect in complicated and comedic ways as their lives both come apart and come together. Dickey tantalized readers with strange entanglements such as two good friends who, each unbeknownst to the other, are being cheated on by the same man. The author's shifting of points of view in the story between the three major characters confirmed his ability to convey different types of women. "Remarkably, Dickey is able both to create believable female characters and to explore the 'sister-sister' relationship with genuine insight," noted Lillian Lewis in her review in Booklist.

One year later, Dickey struck literary gold again with Friends and Lovers, also published by Dutton. "Second novelist Dickey more than fulfills the promise shown in Sister, Sister (1996), again offering real characters and invigorating, believable dialogue," praised Kirkus Reviews in its assessment of the book. In this novel, Dickey explored the lives of two young black men and two young black women whose love lives take them on a roller coaster ride. Filled with comedic misunderstandings that threaten to derail both budding and established romances, Friends and Lovers once again offered chapters in the voices of each character and lots of "engagingly trendy dialogue" (Publishers Weekly). Clearly, Dickey borrowed from his own life for this story, as the characters include a computer-company executive and an aspiring stand-up comedian. The importance of friendship is a key theme of the book, especially its power to overcome tragedy. Issues such as how to recognize when a romance is for real, when and when not to have sex, and when to get married are handled deftly by Dickey in what Publishers Weekly called "another sexy, sophisticated portrayal of hip black L.A." Dickey's second novel repeated the success of Sister, Sister by also making it to the top of Essence's "Blackboard Bestsellers List."

Dickey's appeal with readers, as noted in a review of his novel Milk in My Coffee in a 1998 issue of Publishers Weekly, Dickey rested on his "easy mastery of dialogue and voice" and his "cheerful, wittily acerbic eye for the troubles that plague lovers in the 1990s." Milk in My Coffee dealt with a black man named Jordan Greene who begins dating a white woman and must deal with the negative reactions of his own black friends. When his pal Solomon tells him, "If you go white stay outta sight," Jordan tries to figure out what his own values are regarding romance that crosses the color line. "Dickey goes far beyond the stereotypes, infusing all his characters with complex emotional lives," wrote Ron Hogan in his review of the book for the Amazon.com site on the Web. Booklist noted that the book confirmed Dickey's continuing maturation as a writer, saying that "this story is definitely more developed than his two previous novels."

At a Glance …

Born on July 7, 1961, Memphis, TN. Education: Memphis State University (now University of Memphis), BS, Computer System Technology, 1983; attended University of California at Los Angeles, 1995–97.

Career: Rockwell International, software development, 1983–92; actor and stand-up comedian, 1980s–90s; Rowland Unified School District, educator, 1994–97; writer, novelist, 1992–.

Memberships: Alpha Phi Alpha, 1980–; International Black Writers and Artists, (IBWA/LA), 1993–; Project Reach, mentor, 1996–.

Awards: City of Pomona, CA, Proclamation, 1998; Edna Crotchfield Founders Award, Commitment as Literary Artist, 1995; NAACP Image Award nomination for Outstanding Fiction, 2001, 2002, 2003, and 2004.

Addresses: Publisher—c/o Dutton, 375 Hudson St., New York, NY 10014; Web—www.ericjeromedickey.com.

Into the 2000s Dickey continued to write a novel or more each year. Though his first books explored the yearning for marriage often felt in young adulthood romance, his subsequent novels dealt with more mature relationships and sometimes the rumblings of divorce. Liar's Game explored the complexity past regrets bring to new relationships, and Between Lovers exposes the life of a woman from the perspective of the man she left at the altar. While Dickey populated most of his stories with middle-class characters, he explored the love lives of those more down-on-their-luck in Thieves Paradise and Drive Me Crazy, with tales of love affairs and illegal dealings. No matter the setting of his stories or social class of his characters, Dickey formed a solid fan base and garnered critical praise for each successive novel. Dickey explained in an interview on the Book Page Web site that he never started a story with a firm plan for its ending, no moral he was trying to highlight; he simply followed where his characters took him. "The moment readers open my novels I hope Eric Jerome Dickey and his opinions disappear, and it's the characters who keep them turning the page," Dickey told Essence.

But Dickey's writing career does more than just keep readers turning pages. Dickey's screenplay Cappucino was shown in 1998 at the Pan African Film Festival at the Magic Johnson Theater in Los Angeles, and has since been aired in other film festivals. His Friends and Lovers book was turned into a film in 2005. Dickey also broadened his creative output by signing with Marvel to create a six issue comic series about the marriage of the two most widely recognized black superheroes, Black Panther and Storm. The first issues of the comic were printed in the spring of 2006. Despite these sidelights, Dickey continued to pump out novels; his twelfth, Chasing Destiny about a pregnant woman and her married boyfriend, was published in 2006.

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Eric Jerome Dickey, originally from Memphis, Tennessee, is the national best-selling author of Pleasure, Waking with Enemies, Sleeping with Strangers, Chasing Destiny, Genevieve, Drive Me Crazy, Naughty or Nice, The Other Woman, Thieves' Paradise, Between Lovers, Liar's Game, Cheaters, Milk in My Coffee, Friends and Lovers, and Sister Sister, as well as a contributor to Got to Be Real and NAL's Mothers & Sons. He worked as a computer programmer, a middle school teacher, actor, and stand up comic before becoming a full-time novelist.

Eric grew up on the south side of Memphis, living on Kansas Street. He went to Riverview Elemetary, Riverview Junior High, and Carver High. After graduating high school, he went to college at Memphis State University, where he earned a degree in Computer System Technology. In 1983, he moved to Los Angeles to pursue a career in engineering.



Dickey was employed in the aerospace industry working at Rockwell International, ASSD division, as a software developer, before deciding that he wanted to pursue acting and stand-up comedy, and began the local and national comedy circuit.

Dickey wrote several comedy scripts for his personal comedy act, and later began writing short stories. In 1994, his first published short story "Thirteen" appeared in the IBWA's River Crossing, Voices of the Diaspora--an Anthology of the International Black Experience. A second short story "Days Gone By" was published in the magazine A Place to Enter.

Eric Jerome Dickey then developed a screenplay called "Cappuccino." "Cappuccino" was directed and produced by Craig Ross Jr. and appeared in coffeehouses around the Los Angeles area. In February 1998, "Cappuccino" made its local debut during the Pan African Film Festival at the Magic Johnson Theater in Los Angeles.

Eric Jerome Dickey has authored fifteen novels and has been featured in a variety publications, including Essence magazine, USA Today and The Los Angeles Times, and his novels have appeared on the bestseller lists of the "Blackboard," The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. Dickey has appeared as a guest on many shows, including BET's Our Voices and CNN's Sunday Morning Live.

His latest books, "Sleeping with Strangers" and "Waking with Enemies" were released on April 10, 2007 and August 7, 2007, respectively. His 14th novel, "Pleasure", was released in April, 2008.

Eric is the author of the graphic novel called 'Storm', detailing the first meeting between the popular X-Men character Ororo Munroe and the king of the fictional land of Wakanda, the Black Panther.

Eric Jerome Dickey is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

On November 1, 2008 Eric will release his 15th solo work entitled Dying for Revenge.

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